How to install vSphere 5.5 client on a domain controller

I get really excited when a new version of software comes out because I’m anxious to try out all of the new features. While exploring vSphere 5.5 however, I noticed that there are some serious consequences to diving in head first. Whether it’s the incompatibility of vSphere 5.5 hardware version 10 with the vSphere thick client or trying to do simple things like install vSphere 5.5 client on a domain controller, VMware has really started sticking it to their fans who use their free products.

 

For example, note in this screen shot that “In vSphere 5.5, all new vSphere features are available only through the vSphere Web Client.” In other words, if you want to use the features we’ve released, pay us a ton of money and go buy vCenter Server. I’m completely befuddled by this response to their fans given Microsoft’s push to drive virtualization costs down by including the fairly full featured hypervisor in it’s server package.

VMwarevSphereClient

Alas, I digress…

Installing vSphere 5.5 Client on a Domain Controller

I’m certainly not going to avoid using vSphere 5.5, but I if I’m going to use it, I really needed to be able to install vSphere on a Domain Controller. If you download the vSphere 5.5 client and launch it on a domain controller, you get the following message.

I started doing some research and it turns out that getting the vSphere 5.5 client installed on a domain controller is as simple as launching the installer from the CLI with a simple flag on the end.

I get really excited when a new version of software comes out because I’m anxious to try out all of the new features. While exploring vSphere 5.5 however, I noticed that there are some serious consequences to diving in head first. Whether it’s the incompatibility of vSphere 5.5 hardware version 10 with the vSphere thick client or trying to do simple things like install vSphere 5.5 client on a domain controller, VMware has really started sticking it to their fans who use their free products.

 

For example, note in this screen shot that “In vSphere 5.5, all new vSphere features are available only through the vSphere Web Client.” In other words, if you want to use the features we’ve released, pay us a ton of money and go buy vCenter Server. I’m completely befuddled by this response to their fans given Microsoft’s push to drive virtualization costs down by including the fairly full featured hypervisor in it’s server package.

VMwarevSphereClient

Alas, I digress…

Installing vSphere 5.5 Client on a Domain Controller

I’m certainly not going to avoid using vSphere 5.5, but I if I’m going to use it, I really needed to be able to install vSphere on a Domain Controller. If you download the vSphere 5.5 client and launch it on a domain controller, you get the following message.

I started doing some research and it turns out that getting the vSphere 5.5 client installed on a domain controller is as simple as launching the installer from the CLI with a simple flag on the end.

VMware-viclient-all-5.5.0-1281650.exe /VSKIP_OS_CHECKS="1"


Rumor has it that this way of disuading people from installing vSphere client on a domain controller is actually a result of Microsoft’s best practices given the following statement reportedly from VMware directly.Launching it this way causes the client to disregard the fact that it’s installing on a domain controller.

“We did this deliberately to enforce a Microsoft standard that our guys agree with – don’t install software on a DC, but they made that decision in isolation. Nothing more than that. So use the workaround safely and hopefully we can undo this in the future.”

In any case, I’ve done it in a production environment without any issues whatsoever and feel comfortable recommending that others do so as well, just like you’ve likely done in the past. Enjoy, and as always, let me know if this helped you. Thanks!

Launching it this way causes the client to disregard the fact that it’s installing on a domain controller.

Rumor has it that this way of disuading people from installing vSphere client on a domain controller is actually a result of Microsoft’s best practices given the following statement reportedly from VMware directly.

“We did this deliberately to enforce a Microsoft standard that our guys agree with – don’t install software on a DC, but they made that decision in isolation. Nothing more than that. So use the workaround safely and hopefully we can undo this in the future.”

In any case, I’ve done it in a production environment without any issues whatsoever and feel comfortable recommending that others do so as well, just like you’ve likely done in the past. Enjoy, and as always, let me know if this helped you. Thanks!

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VMware, remove floppy device in guest OS

It was so obvious 🙂

This issue occurs when the standard floppy drive is enabled in the BIOS settings of the virtual machine.

To resolve this issue, you must disable the floppy drive in the guest machine.

To disable the floppy drive in the guest machine:
Power off the virtual machine.
Right-click the virtual machine and click Edit Settings.
Click the Option Tab.
Click Boot Options under Advanced.
Select the The next time the virtual machine boots, force entry into the BIOS setup screen option.
Power on the virtual machine.
Using arrow keys, disable Legacy Diskette A:.
Press F10 to save the changes and exit. The machine reboots and completes the configuration.

http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1034616

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Disable “sponsorize” installation in Java

Digging a bit into the problem myself, I’ve found that there’s an hidden switch to disable sponsor offerings in the auto-update installer.

Open the following keys into the Windows Registry Editor (regedit.exe):
•HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\JavaSoft
•HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\JavaSoft (available only on Windows 64-bit)

and create in both of them a new String Value (type REG_SZ) named SPONSORS of value DISABLE (both name and value must be uppercase).

Alternatively, copy and paste the following code into a text file called disable_java_sponsors.reg and double click on it to import these values in your Registry.
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\JavaSoft]
“SPONSORS”=”DISABLE”

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\JavaSoft]
“SPONSORS”=”DISABLE”

Please note that this switch not only disables the Ask.com toolbar installation and prompt, but disables all of the sponsors potentially bundled with the Auto-update setup/Online setup (Google toolbar, Yahoo toolbar, McAfee something, etc…)

Another way, without having to download and rename or create a new .REG file, is to copy and paste the following two lines into an elevated CMD prompt:

reg add HKLM\software\javasoft /v “SPONSORS” /t REG_SZ /d “DISABLE” /f
reg add HKLM\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\JavaSoft /v “SPONSORS” /t REG_SZ /d “DISABLE” /f

see also:
http://www.howtogeek.com/198240/avoid-javas-ask-toolbar-installations-with-this-one-weird-registry-hack/

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Sysinternals Live

The Sysinternals web site was created in 1996 by Mark Russinovich and Bryce Cogswell to host their advanced system utilities and technical information. Whether you’re an IT Pro or a developer, you’ll find Sysinternals utilities to help you manage, troubleshoot and diagnose your Windows systems and applications.

 Sysinternals Live

Sysinternals Live is a service that enables you to execute Sysinternals tools directly from the Web without hunting for and manually downloading them. Simply enter a tool’s Sysinternals Live path into Windows Explorer or a command prompt as http://live.sysinternals.com/<toolname> or  \\live.sysinternals.com\tools\<toolname>.

You can view the entire Sysinternals Live tools directory in a browser at http://live.sysinternals.com.

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